Music 3.0: Now There Is A Book

The paradigm has shifted and everything you knew about the music business has completely changed. Who are the new players in the music business? Why are traditional record labels, television, and radio no longer factors in an artist’s success? How do you market and

M3cover

distribute your music in the new music world – and how do you make money? This book answers these questions and more in its comprehensive look at the new music business – Music 3.0. While Music 2.0 encompassed the era of file sharing and digital distribution, Music 3.0 employs new ways to start and sustain a career, to develop an audience and engage them with interactive marketing. Sales, distribution, and marketing have reconfigured so much that even artists located far away from a big media center can thrive without the help of a record label – if they know how. Music 3.0 explains what has changed, why it will change even more, and how musicians and artists (photographers, writers, animators) can take advantage of the changes.

via www.amazon.com

OK, I didn’t think that “Music 3.0” was entirely original with me, but my interpretation of the points of demarcation is a bit different from what’s being described here.

In my litany, “the era of file sharing and digital distribution” is all part of Music 3.0, not 2.0. 2.0 is the era of physical products; once the content is separated product – cylinder, vinyl, CD — you’re into the new era.

Regardless, the essential premise is the same: “new ways to start and sustain a career….with interactive marketing.” It is all possible because of the technologies that accompany the separation of content from product.

And yes, the same principals apply to any form of art that can be distributed digitally. Why, I might just have to by myself a copy of this to see what I can apply to my photography.

@americanafest @artistdata @reverbnation #music Internet Tools Panel

Oddly poorly attended panel. You’d think more people would want to hear what these people have to say.

Brenden Mulligan, Artist Data: “we don’t make you more famous, we make you more efficient.

Larry Karnowski, ReviewShine: Syndicate your music to bloggers.

Lou Plaia, ReverbNation: “The complete solution for artists (we don’t care if fans come to our site – !?)

Randy Perry, MyEmma: more than a list, metrics on user response. SMS coming in 2010.

More when I get WiFi at lunch.

@americanafest @artistdata @reverbnation #music Internet Tools Panel

@americanafest The Rubber Hits the Road…

Borgespanel …where the rubber, literally, hits the road.

That’s the take away from a panel at the AMA Conference on the subject of Artist Develoment. It’s all about life on the road.

The panel consisted of emerging artist Sarah Borges and her team: her manager, her booking agent, her radio rep, and two two publicists from her label (Sugar Hill).

Sarah has been working the program, and making the sacrifices necessary to stay on the road at long stretches with her band, “The Broken Singles,” and the effort has paid off in a growing fan base and exposure on NPR, etc.

Most insightful comment came from Sarah’s manager, Jeannie Smith, who stressed the difference between the objective of a major label release and and indie artist like Sarah: “we’re not looking for the hit, we’re looking for the fan.”

And then there was the story of Nashville favorite David Olney. Moderator Peter Cooper relayed the story of Olney saying “in any given city, there are only 30 people who like my shit.”  The trick for an artist like Olney is getting those 30 people to show up whenever he does.

But still, “success” at that level sounds a lot like what Buddha said about enlightenment.  A devotee asked Buddha once, “what was it like for your before you reached enlightenment?  Buddha thought about that for a second and answered, “chop wood, carry water.”

“And after enlightenment?” the devotee asked.

And Buddha replied, “chop wood, carry water.”

And the key to that success, according to Sarah, boils down to learning how to be comfortable outside your comfort zone.  And being willing to spend seven arduous years before the industry will recognize you as a “new and emerging artist.

Music 3.0 Basics

From Americana Conference re Sarah Borges. Even in the world of Music 3.0, the basic paradigm of building an audience persists: Label, radio, manager, booking, and tour, tour, tour.
Music 3.0 Basics