Beth: It’s All About The Hat

After a too-long hiatus from that sort of thing, I did a model/portrait shoot a couple of weeks ago with the effervescent @BethLeannGobble. She first caught my eye when I noticed her at a gathering where she was wearing this hat. I liked the way it framed her face and managed to muster the gumption to ask her i I could photograph her. Conveniently, she needed some photos as much as I needed to shoot some, so it was a perfect “TFP” situation. Beth was great to work with and we got some cool shots, mostly using the natural light around her home in East Nashville. .

The Last Monk Standing

A touring musician friend posted some photos this morning from Whitby Abbey, on the Yorkshire coast of Northern England; that reminded me of my first visit there in the spring of 2013 (jeez, five years ago!). Whitby figures prominently in English ecclesiastical history. It was here in 664AD that the Celtic traditions of the early church in England were discarded in favor of the rituals of the Roman hierarchy – thus setting the stage for Henry VIII’s Reformation and the ruin of great abbeys and monasteries throughout Britain – like this one built on the site of the synod in the 13th-15th centuries.

File this one under “the seeds of destruction are planted in the creation.”

Tim Buckley: Morning Glory

For your Sunday listening pleasure:

I started thinking of this song yesterday after Stacy Widelitz posted a link to the first Blood Sweat & Tears album, “Child is Father to the Man” as his first entry in that “10 most influential albums” thing that seems to be making the rounds lately…
 
I thought of this song because that album was one of the few (only?) albums that delivered a cover of a Tim Buckley song, “Morning Glory.” I think the only other time Tim Buckley made it into “pop” culture was when the song “Once I Was” played near the end for the Vietnam War film “Coming Home” with Bruce Dern, John Voight and Jane Fonda.  I’ll share that clip at the end for this post. 
I started thinking about “Morning Glory” because there is something about it’s soothing, plaintive tone that just seems like a necessary antidote to the tone of these tumultuous times (personally and generally).
So this morning as I was driving into work I asked Siri to “Play ‘Morning Glory’ by Tim Buckley.’
I was a little miffed at first when Apple Music pulled up this live version of the song, its algorithms apparently confusing it with the studio recording from Buckley’s breakthrough 1967 album “Goodbye and Hello.” But as I listened to it, I was grateful for the cross reference.
For starters, this live performance demonstrates the pure, brilliant clarity in Tim Buckley’s vocals even more than the studio version.  I like the instrumentation too: the elaborate piano, strings and vocal chorus of the studio version on “Goodbye and Hello” is replaced here by Buckley’s Guild 12-string, and the simple bass,  vibes and electric guitar that Buckley drew on for what I consider his best record, 1968’s “Happy Sad.”
So there ya go.  I gotta get this posted and get to the store…
 
And here is “Once I Was” from “Coming Home,” released in 1978 – 4 years after Tim Buckley’s untimely demise, from an overdose at the tender age of 28 in 1974 (yes, the same age that his son, Jeff Buckley, died at in 1997).