Category - travel

When Traveling…

…timing is everything.

We were in Darien, Connecticut.  After running an errand, we were looking for something to do… found a link to the historic Bates-Scofield House and museum and thought that might be an interesting way to while a way some time.

Until we got there and found this:

…and you are here on Friday #timingiseverything #digest

Something rather like this happened when we were in Scotland

Welcome to New England February 19, 2014 at 02:24PM

Ann and I will be spending the week of Feb 19-25 in the New York City area.  We’re going up primarily for the wedding of my niece, my sister’s daughter Emily.

I’m not particularly keen on the idea of going anywhere north of the Mason Dixon line this time of year…

We have arrived at our (first) destination. This is why I don’t live “back east” any more, or travel north of the Mason-Dixon Line between Thanksgiving and Easter. #snowmageddon #winter2014 #thisisridiculous #onlyforfamily

Haystack Rock – Canon Beach, Oregon

And the end of an era (for me, anyway…)

I was just scrolling through my photo archives in search of something and found this instead —from June, 2003.

Ann’s boys had just moved to Portland, Oregon and this was our first visit out there to see them.

It was about a month later  that I got my first serious digital camera, a Nikon D100, so this one of the last photos I shot with my trusty old Nikon F2 and that mysterious, antiquated substance called “film.”

Computer Desktop Photoart Installation Instructions

Thank you for subscribing to the CohesionArts Weekly Digest.  We hope you find it entertaining and amusing if not profoundly informative.

To download and install the files, please follow these steps: 

1. After you have completed your subscription form, a confirmation request will arrive in your inbox.  Click on the link in that message.  As soon as you confirm your subscription, a new window should open in your default browser with the link to the file download.

2. Click on download link in r browser; If you can, tell the browser which folder you want the filed to download into; if you can’t, it will wind up in your default “downloads” folder.

3.  Find the downloaded file and drag it into the folder where keep you desktops – typically something like /pictures/desktops/.

4.  Double click on the .zip file to open the archive; this will create a new sub-folder; your desktop photos will be in that folder.

Those steps should work for either MacOS or Windows (if you’re using something than those two common operating systems then you’re more advanced than we are – and you’re on your own).

It’s been almost 7 years now since we stopped using Windows/PCs, so we don’t recall precisely how desktop images are installed for Windows, but it must be something like this process on a Mac:

5. Go to the “System Preferences panel.

6. Select “Desktop & Screen Saver” and then highlight the ‘Desktop” tab.

7. Toward the bottom left corner of that panel you’ll see a “+ ” button.  Click that button and a “Finder (Windows=”Explorer”) window will open.  Navigate to the folder where you stashed the files in step 3 above.

8.  That folder will then show up in the list of desktop image folders, and should become the selected folder for your desktop images

9.  Select the image you want to serve as your desktop, then select among the other options like “Change picture” every xx minutes.

10.  If you use the “Spaces” feature of OSX (or the Windows equivalent, I have no idea what it would be called…), you’ll have to set a new desktop for each “Space” that have open.

Trust us, it sounds more difficult than it actually is.

The files that we offer for desktops changes from time to time, but these instructions should work regardless of what files you are downloading.  If you’re still having issues, please contact list man@cohesionarts.com and we’ll try to help you out.

Thanks again for subscribing to The Weekly Digest.

We Have Found Hell

And people wonder why I am leery of winter travel:

It might not be "hell," but you can sure see it from here...

It might not be “hell,” but you can sure see it from here…

A columnist for the Atlanta Journal-Constitution describes her 18 hour! journey from office to home:

The third gas station does have gas, but there’s no getting near it. Cars jam the driveways and side roads from every direction, inches away from hitting each other. I watch from afar as desperate motorists carry empty water jugs and two-liter Coke bottles to the pumps and fill them with fuel. I never knew gas had a yellow tint.

I turn into Publix, which is serving as another makeshift shelter, and buy water jugs. There, even more people are asleep in the aisles. One man opts to sleep on a shelf. He just moves those Duralogs right out of the way and stretches out like he’s in a bunk bed on a tour bus. Some people huddle around a small TV at a check-out line and watch a movie with Jamie Foxx and Channing Tatum.

When I was a sailor in Hawaii back in the 1980s, I came to the conclusion that “the most important thing a sailor ever learns is when not to.”

I think the same could be said for leaving the house in the winter.

Portals of Stone: The 2014 Calendar Version

And now, a bit of shameless self promotion:

28_back_coverYou do know that there’s a new year starting in a few weeks, right?

But… how will you know for sure unless you have a colorful calendar on your wall that reminds you of the fact every 30 days or so?

Oh, sure, that digital thing in your pocket will keep you up to date well enough.  But where’s the fun in that.  It’s so… one dimensional!

Consider, on the other hand, the three-dimensional, time-warping qualities of these images:

First, they will help you identify the present date.  Sure, any calendar can do that, but these calendars also…

…Transport your imagination into a time in the not so distant past (i.e. centuries, not millennia) when great edifices were carved from stone, by hand, and constructed over several decades.  Many of which lie in ruin today…

…and through which you are transported into the cosmos and offered a glimpse of the vastness of space and time – in the form of starlight that left its source millions of years ago…as captured by a giant camera/telescope suspended in orbit around the earth.

The images are “Portals of Stone” – rendered in ink, on card stock… a new “portal” every month through the new year.

Just follow the link to see more at…

PORTALSOFSTONE.COM

or follow this easy PayPal button to order yours today:



Rosslyn at Dawn

I’ve been in Scotland for a week.  I haven’t spent nearly as much time sorting and editing as I have shooting, but some of what I’ve got to show for my presence you can see here.

– – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – – –

Rosslyn Chapel at Dawn

Rosslyn Chapel at Dawn

Photographers live for about four hours every day: the two hours on either side of sunrise and sunset.  That’s the best natural light of the day.  The rest of the day is for location scouting (or so I’ve been told).

Somebody asked me once, “which do you prefer, sunrise or sunset?”  To which I replied, “well, I’m usually awake by sunset…”

And that has been the case so far on this expedition.  Despite my best intentions, I’ve slept through every sunrise.  That might have something to do with fact that the sun sets at this latitude at about 9:30 PM, and the twilight lingers until nearly 11.  And  I’ve been out every evening photographing something at sunset, though the actual sun has been mostly obscured by clouds.

After that, you get back to your room, download the memory card, sort the photos and edit a few, and by the time you start nodding out it’s 1:30 AM.  Not exactly conducive to starting again at 3:30 (since the sunrises at about 4:30…).

Tweed River Valley btw Melrose and Rosslyn

Tweed River Valley btw Melrose and Rosslyn

Yesterday I made the short – and lovely – drive from Melrose to Rosslyn, which is my whole reason for being here in the first place.  And last night I went out again at sunset and looked for something to shoot at the end of the first completely sunny day I’ve had all week.  After that, same drill… fell asleep at the keyboard about 1AM…

But this morning something very different happened: I woke up and saw the moon setting in a perfectly clear sky outside my window.  I looked at the time on my iPhone: 4:24.  Like an idiot I tried to go back to sleep.

But whatever higher power brought me here intervened.

Despite my best efforts to go back to sleep, that was not gonna happen.

In the absence of sleep I opened Google Earth on my iPad (there was just enough signal to get a view) and entered the coordinates for Rosslyn Chapel, which is about 2-1/2 miles from the b&b where I’m staying.  From the map I could see there is a road that goes past the chapel to the edge of a field on the eastern side.  From paintings and photos I’ve seen from that angle, I knew there was some kind of meadow on that side of the chapel.

I threw on some clothes and was there by 5:30, just as the sun was peaking over the hills.

Medieval churches, chapels, and abbeys were typically laid out so that the altar – and the grand windows above it – face east, so that the rising sun can remind worshipers of the Resurrection (note to fundamentalist Christians: you do know that Muslims face east for their prayers, too, right?).

The  combination clear sky and the rising sun meant that the best natural light I’ve seen all week was shining down on the nearly 600-year-old of east facade of the Rosslyn Chapel just as I was getting my tripod set up.

Left to my own devices, I might have slept right through it.  But I swear, some power better than myself hauled me out of bed, threw clothes on me, and steered my rent-a-car through the pre-dawn light to get these photos.

Now, behold the majesty of 15th Century architecture:

Rosslyn Chapel at Dawn

Rosslyn Chapel at Dawn

 

I’ve had good moments and bad moments on this trip.  The good ones are usually after I’ve been shooting for several hours, and I’ve taken the time to marvel at the fact that I am even here, doing this extraordinary thing.  The bad ones are after I’ve sat at the computer with the results from the day and thought “oh crap, I missed that… shoulda framed that differently… oh, look at THAT… that I didn’t quite get in the frame…”  etc. etc.  All common photographers’ laments.

But today, I can take some solace in the knowledge that however else the rest of the day goes, I got this part right:

Detail of the East Facade of the Rosslyn Chapel

Detail of the East Facade of the Rosslyn Chapel

 

But only because that Higher Power would not leave me to my own devices and let me sleep through the dawn.

I wish I could remember now who was it who said, “you do the work… and the inspiration takes care of itself…”

 

T-Minus 1 – How The Return To Scotland Came About

This is the third installment of a series on how my trip to Scotland / England came about.  The first installment is here, the second installment (a bit of a sidebar) is here.

Listen to John Doan’s harp guitar while reading this post:

Now, where was I? Oh yeah….

One of the most stunning places we visited in Scotland last October is a small church several miles outside of Edinburgh called the Rosslyn Chapel.

Rosslyn Chapel ©2012 paul@cohesionarts.com

Rosslyn Chapel ©2012 paul@cohesionarts.com

If you’ve read “The DaVinci Code” or seen the movie, you might recognize the name.  Dan Brown wrote the last scene of that story at the Rosslyn Chapel. The bones of Mary Magdalen – the real “Holy Grail” as portrayed in the novel – supposedly having been hidden there, in a a secret crypt concealed under the foundation of the chapel when it was built during 15th century.

We almost didn’t go to Rosslyn.  When it was first suggested to us, I looked it up on the web and the first thing I noticed on the website was

Please note that there is no photography or video allowed inside Rosslyn Chapel.

And when I read that I thought to myself, “well, that’s a deal breaker….”

But I talked it over with Ann and we agreed that it would be worth seeing even we couldn’t take pictures inside.  We figured it in to the itinerary for the last full day of our  trip, when we would be back in Edinburgh for two nights and still have the rental car at our disposal.

So on morning of the last day of our tour of Scotland, we ventured out of Edinburgh about 7 miles south to the village of Rosslyn.

And yes, the interior of Rosslyn Chapel is truly extraordinary.  Nearly every surface is adorned with detailed masonry carvings depicting the history of the area, the chapel’s founders and builders, or a passage from the Bible, all rendered by the most skilled stone masons of the 15th century.

Entrance to the Rosslyn Chapel - ©2012 paul@cohesionarts.com

Gargoyles guarding the entrance to the Rosslyn Chapel – ©2012 ann@cohesionarts.com

In the centuries since its construction, the tiny Chapel as been through all kinds of depredations, from serving as stable for Cromwell’s cavalry in the 17th century to an ill conceived conservation effort in the mid-20th century that coated all the  carvings with an impermeable layer of magnesium fluoride that trapped moisture inside the stone.   Just about the time that The DaVinci Code was released, the Sinclair family that owns the chapel and surrounding estate embarked on a more enlightened course of preservation, and now, in the wake of the novel and the movie, the Rosslyn Chapel is among the most popular tourist destinations in all of Great Britain.

Ann and I spent most of the morning of our last full day in Scotland there.   We made a lot of photographs of the exterior, and spent enough time inside to come out pretty well awed at what we’d seen.  But, per the rules, no photos of the interior.

– – – – – – – –

John Doan

John Doan

Fast forward now to  January 28th, when I received an e-mail from a musician named  John Doan.  John is is primarily a harp guitarist; his home base is Salem, Oregon.

If you’re not familiar with it, the harp guitar is an instrument that starts as a guitar, but is embellished with an extension of the body of the guitar  that supports some number of open, unfretted strings, usually bass notes, that are plucked separately in the same manner that the strings of a harp are plucked.   John Doan typically plays a variation of the harp guitar that includes a further set of “super treble” notes that are strung musically above (physically below) the 6 guitar strings.

I can’t recall now when I first discovered John Doan’s recordings, most of which I purchased via iTunes during the period when I was still paying for downloads (which I rarely do now, with the advent of streaming subscription services like Spotify).  But since I first discovered him I have been an avid fan of his Celtic-infused, sonically rich recordings that evoke the spirit of the islands with which I am so enamored.  I met John briefly once, at an annual event called “The Harp Guitar Gathering” when it was held in Indianapolis in the fall of 2010.  That’s probably when I put myself on his mailing list.

So I get this e-mail from John Doan in late January.  And after the usual “this is what I’m up to…” stuff, I scanned his tour itinerary at the bottom of the message.  And that’s where I saw:

May 26: Rosslyn Chapel, Scotland

Whoa.  Did I read that right? A concert inside the Rosslyn Chapel??

I quickly fired an e-mail back to John.

Can you use a roadie/photographer on these gigs?

I need an excuse to go back to Britain this spring…

Where “back to Britain” was a link to the site were I was gathering and displaying our photos from the trip in October.

John’s reply to that was pretty non-committal, but the more I thought about it, the more intrigued I became about the proposition, so I sent another message:

Please forgive the quick “need a roadie?” message that I sent earlier
today.

This time… I think I’m serious….

..after which wheels started turning…

Long story short: I’m leaving tomorrow afternoon, and will meet up with John and his entourage of wandering minstrels a week from today at Rosslyn.  And I will have permission to photograph his concert inside the Rosslyn Chapel.

Two weeks ago Ann and I encountered a Scottish photographer a the TACA Arts & Crafts fair here in Nashville.  We got to talking, and I told him that I would be going to Scotland soon, and that I’d be photographing inside the Rosslyn Chapel.

“That’s forbidden!” he said.

Yes, it is. But I’ve got special dispensation.

And that’s why I’m going back to Scotland tomorrow.

Rosslyn Chapel - a Victorian-era carving over the North Entrance ©2012paul@cohesionarts.com

Rosslyn Chapel – a Victorian-era carving over the North Entrance ©2012paul@cohesionarts.com