Author - Paul S

@americanafest @artistdata @reverbnation #music Internet Tools Panel

Oddly poorly attended panel. You’d think more people would want to hear what these people have to say.

Brenden Mulligan, Artist Data: “we don’t make you more famous, we make you more efficient.

Larry Karnowski, ReviewShine: Syndicate your music to bloggers.

Lou Plaia, ReverbNation: “The complete solution for artists (we don’t care if fans come to our site – !?)

Randy Perry, MyEmma: more than a list, metrics on user response. SMS coming in 2010.

More when I get WiFi at lunch.

@americanafest @artistdata @reverbnation #music Internet Tools Panel

@americanafest The Rubber Hits the Road…

Borgespanel …where the rubber, literally, hits the road.

That’s the take away from a panel at the AMA Conference on the subject of Artist Develoment. It’s all about life on the road.

The panel consisted of emerging artist Sarah Borges and her team: her manager, her booking agent, her radio rep, and two two publicists from her label (Sugar Hill).

Sarah has been working the program, and making the sacrifices necessary to stay on the road at long stretches with her band, “The Broken Singles,” and the effort has paid off in a growing fan base and exposure on NPR, etc.

Most insightful comment came from Sarah’s manager, Jeannie Smith, who stressed the difference between the objective of a major label release and and indie artist like Sarah: “we’re not looking for the hit, we’re looking for the fan.”

And then there was the story of Nashville favorite David Olney. Moderator Peter Cooper relayed the story of Olney saying “in any given city, there are only 30 people who like my shit.”  The trick for an artist like Olney is getting those 30 people to show up whenever he does.

But still, “success” at that level sounds a lot like what Buddha said about enlightenment.  A devotee asked Buddha once, “what was it like for your before you reached enlightenment?  Buddha thought about that for a second and answered, “chop wood, carry water.”

“And after enlightenment?” the devotee asked.

And Buddha replied, “chop wood, carry water.”

And the key to that success, according to Sarah, boils down to learning how to be comfortable outside your comfort zone.  And being willing to spend seven arduous years before the industry will recognize you as a “new and emerging artist.

Music 3.0 Basics

From Americana Conference re Sarah Borges. Even in the world of Music 3.0, the basic paradigm of building an audience persists: Label, radio, manager, booking, and tour, tour, tour.
Music 3.0 Basics

Pogue’s Take on Zune HD

Pogue.2.190 I'm writing about the "Zune" again?  Must be a tear in the fabric of the universe.  Says David Pogue at the NYTimes:

Over the years, mention of the word “Microsoft” has set off a variety of emotions. Some consider how Microsoft achieved its success, and feel anger. Some consider how Microsoft borrows other companies’ ideas, and feel indignation. Some consider recent battles with Windows, and feel frustration.

via www.nytimes.com

At least he sees the potential of an "all your ears can eat model. Maybe Zune is the gizmo that cracks it open.

Everyody Wants It, But Nobody Wants to Pay?

Maybe that’s because the users know it’s the corporate monoliths that have breathed life into this beast?

Spotify Despite the buzz around Spotify, most users forage on the free content and are loathe to pay for extras. By most estimates, almost all Spotify listeners stick with the company’s free service, and don’t pay for the premium offerings.

Mark McCormick, 25, a graphic designer from Newcastle, signed up for Spotify’s free service about three months ago and now listens about five hours a day at work and at home.

“About three minutes after signing up, you are listening to almost anything you want,” he said. Though he isn’t keen on the advertising, he doesn’t want to sign up for the premium service, because he says £120 ($199) per year is a steep price.

Mr. Ek hopes that mobility will be the tool that changes users’ minds. Last month, Apple approved Spotify’s iPhone application — but only people who sign up for the premium service can use it.

via online.wsj.com

The Wall Street Journal weighs in on the big PR machine in Europe. Seems people like it, but they don’t want to pay for it. That could be a problem.

And, as this article points out, Spotify is owned in part by the big label media companies, which might explain why Spotify is getting off the ground at all — it’s a proving ground for the labels.

Still, if anybody does pay for it… where does the money go?

Whether streamed or downloaded, people will pay for their content if they know the revenue is going to the actual content creators.  But if they think it’s just going to the big media conglomerates, they probably care a lot less about paying for it.

Another Player from Across the Pond

Sky-universal Sky’s music service has been in the works since July last year, but if the latest reports are to be believed it’s about to come thundering out of the gates, offering a streaming service to tackle Spotify by Christmas.


Stuff Magazine’s resident music mogul, Mic Wright, reports Sky’s yet to be named music service has signed up a “major label artist” to promote it, and will be live in time for Christmas.

What’s more, it’ll let you give music packages away as gifts. Sounds like Sky’s got its Christmas sales pitch right there.

via www.electricpig.co.uk

Why is it that all the innovative stuff is happening in Europe?

Now, let's see… Spotify is supposed to be the iTunes killer, and now Sky Music is supposed to be the Spotify Killer, and I just keep listening to Lala.com and nobody ever talks about the Lala killer??